Tag Archives: peter essick

Photographer Q&A: Peter Essick Documents the Pine Beetle Epidemic for National Geographic

Award-winning photojournalist Peter Essick has been traveling the globe documenting environmental issues for the past two decades. He’s also a frequent contributor to National Geographic, having shot more than 40 stories for the publication in the past 25 years. Last April, Peter was commissioned by the magazine to photograph a feature story about a pine beetle outbreak that has destroyed more than 60 million acres of forest from New Mexico to British Columbia. Pine beetles don’t typically exhibit this type of remarkable population growth. So what’s causing the crisis?

The author Hillary Rosner writes, “Rising temperatures and drought have stressed trees, leaving them unable to fight an invasion. Warmer weather also has boosted the beetles’ population and greatly expanded their range. They’re flourishing farther north and at higher elevations, invading pine trees, such as jack pine and whitebark, that had rarely seen them until a few years ago. Because these trees aren’t as good at defending themselves, a smaller band of beetles can overwhelm them. Three-quarters of the mature whitebark pines in Yellowstone National Park are now dead—a blow to grizzly bears, which eat the seeds in autumn, and to Clark’s nutcrackers, which cache the seeds for winter.”

The outbreak originated in the central region of British Columbia and moved through the mountain American Western states of Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho and Washington. Recently, the most active outbreak in the USA occurred in South Dakota. The beetles have also spread across the Rocky Mountains to Alberta during two large storms.

Essick visited all of these regions to photograph the story.  In the Q&A below, we talk to him about the experience.

Helicopter surveying of red trees by the Alberta Government near Grande Prairie a part of a mountain pine beetle control program. The red trees are all marked on GPS and in the crews go back in November and mark a 50 meter circle around infested trees and find all other trees infestested. Then in the winter crews go back and cut down all those trees and burn them.

How exactly does the mountain pine beetle kill the forest?

It attacks the inner bark or phloem that feeds the tree. First, a female beetle bores through the bark, and if she likes the tree she sends out a scent signal for other beetles to come to the tree. Often hundreds of beetles will then bore into the tree within a 24 hour period. The tree puts out sap to try to stop the beetles boring, but usually the beetles can overcome the tree’s defenses. The beetles then begin to chew tunnels through the inner bark where the females each lay about 50 eggs. The eggs then turn to larvae within a week and stay inside the tree throughout winter. If it gets really cold the larvae will die, but because it has been warmer in the winter due to climate change, more larvae are surviving. In early summer, the larvae hatch and then fly to another tree repeating the cycle. In recent warmer years, as many as 10 beetles have been coming out of the tree for each one that entered. That is why there are now outbreaks of beetles that can fill entire forests.

Colorado State University professor and beetle researcher Dan West collects mountain pine beetles from a ponderosa pine that was being attacked in a forest in the Front Range west of Ft. Collins.

How have the locals reacted?

The beetle is a native species and has always been a part of the forest, but now it is causing severe damage to whole forests so the locals don’t like it at all. Some have made a living out of salvage logging and carving the beetle kill wood, but overall it is bad for local economies based on logging or recreation.

In the town of Custer, South Dakota, some locals tried to think of something positive they could do for the community regarding the beetle. They thought of the burning man and came up with the idea to do the burning beetle to draw the community together and hopefully over the long run create a tourist draw.

Burning of Pine Beetle Effigy, Custer, South Dakota. the Ponderosa Pine trees of the Black Hills have been hit hard by the pine beetle. A local woodworker with the help of other in the community constructed a 26-foot long wooden pine beetle out of beetle kill wood and plywood reinforcement. It was loaded with fuel and candle fuses and set on fire

Experimental Fire in Beetlekill Forest, near Vandrhoof, Canada. A group from the Canadian Ministry of Forests is doing a test to see how fire reacts in beetlekill forest. They have several blocks and have firefighters surrounding the blocks before they are set on fire. The trees are mostly in the gray stage so there is a lot od down woody debris and fallen trees low, but no needles on the dead trees.

What attempts have been made to manage the beetle population?

Nothing to date has been successful in controlling the outbreaks. Pheromone patches have been nailed to trees to fool the beetles, but have had limited success. There is an insecticide that can be sprayed on an individual tree, but the cost is about $50/tree for one year of protection. It also kills all other insects in the tree as well. In Alberta, they have been identifying newly attacked trees by helicopter and then going back in the winter and cutting down the trees and burning then hoping to stop or slow down the outbreak. This is very expensive and may or may not work in the long run.

Pine beetle flying on a leash in the lab of Maya Evenden at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. Research is being done here to see how far mountain pine beetles can fly. They have found the average to be about 6km and one flew 24 km.

What was it like traveling around the forest while tracking the beetles? What did you find most challenging about documenting this story?

I did a lot of driving through the western states looking for areas to photograph. The scientists are always interesting to talk to about their research.

The one challenge that was different about this story was doing macro photography of the beetles. The beetle is about the size of a grain of rice, so the photographer needs to use a special lens that can go to 3X to 4X life size to get a full frame photo of the beetle in its environment.

Red Bellied Checkered beetle (Enoclerus sphegeus) preying on a mountain pine beetle.

See a complete lightbox with all of the images from this story here.

View all of Peter’s work available for purchase through Aurora here

New Images for November

An athletic girl stretching on a bridge.

October and November are months of transition, and our recent images reflect that. For some, it’s a transition from warmer days to snow and cold, and making sure they get in every single possible beach day, outdoor run, wave to surf and cliff to jump. For others, it’s about getting in better shape and finding the motivation to be as physically fit as possible, through strenuous outdoor activities or grueling feats of strength in Crossfit. For one photographer, it’s an expectant wife and the possibilities of teaching the child the joys of nature. There’s also the destruction caused by the pine beetle, an aftermath of the rising temperatures, and the scientists working to counter this voracious invader. Or, if you’d prefer, we also have personal adventures and exotic journeys, the Volvo Ocean Race in France, friendly manatee encounters, incredible aerial landscapes, climbing galore, dogsledding, urban chicken raising and high-lining. There’s even an event where people sleep in hammocks on a highline in the Dolomites!

And if you want to skip ahead to the wonderful white world of the winter, who are we to stop you? All this can be viewed here: http://www.auroraphotos.com/result?webseries_id=14734

Their Favorite Winter Pics

Aurora’s contributors are a rare breed, always willing to go the extra mile to capture an amazing image. They thrive in the winter, a season during which many give up on the outdoors and stay inside, sipping hot cocoa and catching up on TV. We wanted to get to the heart of why Aurora photographers connect so profoundly with the harsh conditions and stark beauty of the coldest of seasons. So we asked our photographers to choose their favorite winter image and tell us why — here’s what they said:

Airborne skier flies above clouds

I’ve skied Mt. Adams in Washington 50+ times, and there’s always a risk, either from chance or the failure to recognize dangers. And on this day, I almost got wiped off the North Face by an avalanche. I had climbed the North face North West ridge and halfway up decided to turn around because it was getting too warm. Suddenly, a wet slide was triggered a few thousand feet above me (on a route we had just skied the day before) and came down, missing me by inches. It was only about 20 feet wide, but it was heavy snow and was going very, very fast on a very steep slope. It was a scary moment.” – Jason Hummel

2013

“Mont Blanc is the most famous peak to ascend in the Alps. For me, this image shows how the mountaineers put their lives in the service of the mountain.” – David Santiago Garcia

Underwater Iceberg, Antarctic Peninsula

“I’ve spent years photographing glaciers and ice on six continents, but this is one of my favorite images. It’s shot from a small zodiac inflatable boat in Antarctica, and captures so much of the graceful lines and cold beauty of the massive icebergs there.” – Paul Souders

A man ice climbing a frozen waterfall through a sandstone arch in Utah.

“This unique frozen waterfall, in a remote area of Utah , rarely forms ice solid enough to climb. You have to hike in a ways to find the frozen falls, which keeps the crowds away. “ – Whit Richardson

Two people are climbing a frozen waterfall in Sounkyo Gorge, Daisetsuzan National Park, Hokkaido, Japan.

“The combination of people enjoying adventure sport in a spectacular landscape is what photography is all about for me.”  – Andrew Peacock

A snowboarder soaring in the air at sunrise in the Sierra Nevada mountains near Lake Tahoe, California.

“I’ve been snowboarding most of my life and this image always reminds me of the freedom you feel when you launch into the air on a perfect powder day in the backcountry.” – Rachid Dahnoun

Moonbow, Lake O'Hara and surrounding mountains, Yoho National Park, Canada

It had snowed all day at Lake O’Hara in Yoho National Park, a beautiful park in the Canadian Rockies. After the sun set, it cleared and I went outside. A full moon had risen, and because of the icy particles in the air, a moondog or paraselene was visible. I had often seen a sundog, but I had never seen the moon variety before. It lasted for several minutes before more clouds appeared.” – Peter Essick

Snowfall at Cradle Mountain National Park.

“I went into Cradle Mountain National Park, in Tasmania, with this specific idea: to shoot a pandani plant lit with warm light against the blue cold snowy scene.” – Heath Holden

Big mountain skiing in Haines, Alaska

“I love the vertical symmetry of lights and darks. I love the shadows on the left that mimic mountains, pointing towards the skier. I love the fly-on-wall perspective, along with the speed evoked by the flying snow left by the skier’s wake. And the skier… that’s Seth Morrison, far and away one of skiing’s bigger-than-life legends for the past 2 decades. It was shot in Haines, AK, via helicopter access. It just feels as thought the stars aligned on this one.” – Gabe Rogel

A snowshoer taking in a wintery scene

“This picture taken in Mammoth Lakes, California, is of my brother from Texas, snowshoeing for the first time. It’s my favorite because it captures the wonder and majesty of being out in a snowstorm, when the snow muffles all sound except the crunch of your steps and the quiet patter of snowflakes on your jacket. .”  – Dana Felthauser

Grand Tetons, Wyoming

“This image of the Tetons was a look at an old friend in a new way, a position a bit more north than I had seen before. The breaking storm gave the black and white image an even more commanding sense of the balance of the mountain.” – Joel Addams

See more of our photographer’s favorite winter images here: http://www.auroraphotos.com/index.php?module=result&webseries_id=17499