Tag Archives: fine art

Personal Project – “Non Grata”

Ake Ericson's book, Non Grata, is an unflinching, unadulterated look into the lives of an unwelcome people, who are discriminated against on a daily basis in many countries. With his keen eye, ability to capture poignant moments, and dedication to photojournalism, Ake's able to take the viewer extremely close to the situation. His stark black-and-white photos strongly bring to focus the harsh realities he's documenting. The book is now available for sale, and works from the book will be exhibited at gallery La Moulinette  in Montmatre, Paris from the the 20th of September until the 7th of October.

For over 8 years, I have been documenting the life of the Roma people's daily life across Europe in 18 journeys. I began this project after visiting the southern part of Czech Republic where I witnessed vast discrimination. This moved me so greatly that I committed to photographing this vulnerable community of people. This commitment has taken me on a journey through Czech Republic, France, Sweden, Kosovo, Hungary, Serbia, Romania, Switzerland, Spain and Slovakia to bear witness to these shunned societies.  I have used photography to show the Roma’s living conditions and how they are deprived of political, economical, cultural and social rights. The other aspect of this project has been to show the difficulties the Roma have everywhere to win political influence and get a voice in the media. 

In this long-term photo project, my vision is to continue to shed light on the various facets of the Roma’s life and struggles in Europe today.My genuine hope is that my photo stories can bring a better understanding to the world and help facilitate actions by politicians. My goal is to sustain this project beyond just being another Roma photo story, to dive further into the deeper stories that exist in the shadows of this community. My mission is to show not only show the tragic consequences of the Roma’s reality but also the positive aspects of the Roma being integrated into European life.

You can purchase Ake's book here.
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2/2-2014 Kosice,Slovakia. Outside Kosice many Roma people are displaced in some small villages up in the mountains.
2/2-2014 Kosice,Slovakia.
Outside Kosice many Roma people are displaced in some small villages up in the mountains.
6/28-2013.Lunik IX,Kosice,Slovakia.A childrens game in the ghetto.Juraj Mizigor doing a backflip.
6/28-2013.Lunik IX,Kosice,Slovakia.A childrens game in the ghetto.Juraj Mizigor doing a backflip.
12/22-20154 Stockholm.Sweden. Many Roma from Romania sleeping out in the string Lyla at Olof Palmes gata in Stockholm.Cirka 500 Roma people are homeless in the center of Stockholm.
12/22-20154 Stockholm.Sweden.
Many Roma from Romania sleeping out in the string Lyla at Olof Palmes gata in Stockholm.Cirka 500 Roma people are homeless in the center of Stockholm.
NON GRATA BOOK-5 NON GRATA BOOK-8

Personal Project – “Woodsmen”

Too often, we vilify industries involved in our natural resource management, judging those involved, without knowing much about their lives or even the industry itself. This holds doubly true for industries with a checkered past and those that seem to belong more to the yesteryear than the present.  Michael D. Wilson spent time talking with and photographing loggers and folks in the lumber industry, people we often don't think about, but who have been vital to local economics in our home state of Maine. His beautiful portraits, best seen as large prints or in the 'zine he put together for his solo show in Portland, Maine, grant us some insight into their lives and work, and humanize this oft-maligned industry, continuing a cultural, historical and financial pillar in the region.

From the time the first sawmill opened in South Berwick in 1634, to the 1830’s, when Bangor was the world’s largest lumber port, through the mechanization of the industry in the 20th Century, to the current day’s focus on sustainability, logging has been part of the fabric of Maine.  In an industry constantly changing and reinventing itself, the one constant has been the Woodsman.  The faces pictured here represent in many ways Maine itself – hardy, resourceful, and determined.  Keenly in tune with the land, they continue to provide, as their predecessors did, the foundational materials for building and maintaining strong communities. - Michael D. Wilson

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