Category Archives: Slices of Life

Gratitude for the Outdoors

father and son duck hunting, Suisun Marsh, Suisun City, California, USA

Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday. In contrast to some other national holidays, Thanksgiving offers us the opportunity to focus on our selves and our place in the world as something more than just passive consumers. Amid the frenzy of food preparation, cooking, and table setting, I choose instead to take the opportunity to consider the place that the food has in my life, and my place in the food chain. Whether you eat animals or not, Thanksgiving, with its focus on sharing a central meal, offers an opportunity to reflect on the roles of hunting, agriculture, and human interdependence.

Our modern food supply chain bears more resemblance to the idealized “simpler times” than you’d think – even in the 17th century, there was specialization of roles. I reflect during this meal on the ways we rely on our local farmers, our own gardens, and for some of us, the hunters, fishermen, and foragers in our families. I like to give thanks for the people who care both for and about food year round, and who make sure we have access to healthy meals. It’s also worth reflecting that there are many people in our own communities that don’t always have the same access.

The fresh foods and garden veggies are not the only opportunity to increase and share healthy habits with our loved ones. Thanksgiving gets its name from the giving of thanks for our bounties, and recent studies have confirmed that just the act of giving thanks has myriad health benefits for our selves and our communities, increasing pro-social interaction, physical health, and sleep, while reducing the aggression that is in so many ways encouraged and fostered the very next day – the capitalistic feeding frenzy known as Black Friday.

The outdoors provides us with so much, it’s hard to pick just a few things to feel grateful for. The opportunity to connect with history by growing and stewarding lesser-known heirloom varieties of crops; places to explore, both large and small; an escape from constant electronic stimulations and distractions; (hopefully) safe interactions with, and observations of wildlife; and inspiration. Our photographers, and the outdoors, are the pillars of Aurora — without open, wild spaces, the quiet refuge of the woods, the mystery of the sea, or even a space for recreation in their backyard, they’d be unable to work or play. Here are some of the things our photographers are grateful to the outdoors for.
– Nate Adams and Larry Westler, Aurora Photos

Galen Carter riding in the foothills of the Wasatch Front outside of Salt Lake City, Utah

Wray Sinclair
“I’m thankful for the ability to enjoy the public lands that surround us. From paddling out to surf at 7am in the Pacific Ocean, to skiing endless powder in the backcountry of the Wasatch Mountains, to hiking around the Blue Ridge Mountains. I’m grateful for these places that have had immense impact on my life and business.”

Chris Bennett
“My job takes me around the globe to some of the world’s most beautiful and interesting places. I climb mountains and ride bikes and go for runs for a living! I’m always meeting new people and being challenged by friends I know in the industry. While hours in airports and security lines can be annoying, all I have to do is sit back and think about how I’m not in a cubicle 40 hours a week. For this I am thankful!”
(EDITORS NOTE: Chris is ALSO thankful for the staff at Aurora Photos who do have to spend some of their time in an office, albeit not a cubicle)

A Reflection In A Female Skier's Goggles As She Takes A Selfie Around Cerro Catedral

Ben Girardi
“I am thankful for the mountains that surround my home, and for the cold storms that bring in moisture off the Pacific and dump meters of snow. I love to explore the mountains in all conditions, but am extremely thankful to be able to explore them in the winter season, snowboarding powder with my camera, capturing everyone’s excitement. Snowboarding keeps you young at heart and it shows, when you see full-grown men with a child-like grin shining through snow-filled beards.”

Jen Magnuson
“When I was 26 years old, my body started attacking itself, and I was told by doctors that I needed to accept that, learn to manage it, and find a new normal.  I decided to fight back instead, for five excruciating years.  Every year, the anniversaries of the onset of the symptoms, the final treatments, the loss of my law enforcement career pass, and I am grateful.  I’m grateful for health restored completely, and grateful for an experience that made me focus on making life more of what I love and less of what I though it “should” be.  I’m grateful to be able to see and document places that I can only access under human power, when that human power was almost lost to me 14 years ago.  I guess I found a new normal. . . a life of adventure and beauty and gratitude. . . because even the roughest experiences can hold within them the greatest lessons and outcomes.”

Female surfer walking in water and carrying surfboard against large white cloud, Hawaii, USA

Sean Davey
“I’m thankful for the sea which has inspired and amazed me since I was a toddler. It is the sea that has allowed me to have such a long career as a photographer.   From living in Australia to living in Hawaii and traveling around to so many other places in the world, the ocean has always been the one constant that I could always rely on.  I add to my photographic archive from the sea on a usually every other day basis.  It’s my daily exercise routine as well as my spiritual place.  I am one with the sea.”

Logan Mock-Bunting
“I am thankful for the seasons in Hawaii. Folks who don’t know any better assume that because the weather is nice all year, we don’t have seasons. Incorrect. My two favorite seasons here are Mango Season and Big Wave Season. I often crave sweets after coming out of salt water, and it is really hard to top wrapping up a fun surf or free-dive session by picking and cutting into a fresh, sweet mango. The feeling of being in massive, powerful surf (or even being on shore witnessing it) is one of the most humbling, awesome (and at times unsettling) experiences I know. And the fact that these cycles only come around for a short time each year make them even more precious.”

Helicopter above the Great Blue Hole

Evgeny Vasenev
“I am currently on a one year trip around the globe, and it’s hard to express how amazing and diverse our world is, when limited to words. So far, I have explored mountains, oceans, forests, and savannas, and all of them have inspired me and made my heart beat faster. I am grateful for the ability to see this beauty, to feel the wind on my skin, and to smell the fresh air. Thanks, the world! You are fantastic!”

Chris Kimmel
“I am thankful for the extreme diversity of natural ecosystems that create a stunning mosaic-like landscape in the tiny corner of SW British Columbia that I call home.  I am well-travelled, yet every time I step off the plane at Vancouver International Airport I am thankful to be back; back to a culturally rich, melting pot of humanity, that has more outdoor adventure opportunities than your brain can handle.  Where else can you indulge in world-class skiing, mountain biking, fishing, scuba diving, climbing, camping, canoeing and kayaking in one day…if you could fit it all in? The landscapes that surround me inspire exploration, creation, adventure, and a passion for conservation. They instill in us a greater responsibility to care for the place we all call home.”

Side view waist up shot of senior farmer inspecting blueberry bush in autumn, Stratham, New Hampshire, USA

John Benford
“I am thankful for my local farmers, especially at Thanksgiving time. I appreciate those who toil to bring us sustenance, who turn the soil, pick the produce and milk the cows, so that we can nourish our bodies. The farmers I know – who don’t just work the land but work WITH the land, whose livelihoods depend on the cycle of the seasons, whose lives are intertwined with those of their plants and animals – have a different connection with the earth, with life and death, and with the sacred than the rest of us. There is a part of me that thinks we all should be farmers, at least for some part of our lives, and that might help us transform our relationship with the earth from one of dominion to one of stewardship.”

Joe Klementovich
“I’m thankful for the personal connections that grow through working as a photographer. It might be slogging into the backcountry with a crew, hanging out by the campfire with an art director or shivering in the cold while sharing a belay with an athlete; these are the moments that grow into long-lasting friendships. Exploring and appreciating the outdoors brings us all together. So I send out a huge thank you to all the amazing people that I get to work, play and hang around with. Have an extra slice of pie on me!”

A child looks out the window at a yellow larch tree in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

Robert van Waarden
‘Today, looking out the window, my 1 year old son says to me, “I can see the larch.” The rest of the trees have lost their leaves and the yellowing larches stand out like a child’s sore, but beautiful, thumb. He reminds me of the importance of little things and the small details of changing seasons. Of details that I embrace and capture through my lens that remind us this planet, our only home, is worth fighting for.’ 

Fall Faves

Autumn is one of our favorite times of year, for many reasons (NOT the proliferation of pumpkin-spice-everything): Apple picking, hot cider, root vegetable harvests, crisp air, explosions of color, World Series / NBA opening night, holidays that bring us together, pumpkin carving, and let’s not forget, mocking pumpkin spice products. Our photographers shared their own list of favorite places and activities in autumn, and what makes their spot the best spot in the fall months.

The Eastern Sierras near Mammoth and June Lakes is a outdoor playground that offers incredible fishing, hiking, paddle boarding and scenic wonders.

Upper Owens River near Mammoth Lakes, CA

The water flows quietly, meandering around wide, sweeping turns where Browns and Rainbows are sometimes coaxed from small pockets of deeper water. Fishing the Upper Owens River near Mammoth Lakes, California, is like spending time with your best friend. It’s a place of solitude and comfort where no one needs to talk to understand the magic of being together. Set amid beautiful views of the Eastern Sierra range where faint glimmers of the idle lifts on Mammoth Mountain can be seen for miles, it’s where I’ve returned time again to create memories with my wife and son. As the summer crowds thin-out and the winter crowds still a few months away, fall is the best time to visit “The Owens,” as my family affectionally refers to the river. Tall grass, long shadows and silence, minus perhaps the moo of an errant cow grazing nearby, is what draws us to The Owens each fall. My son (pictured) learned to fish here as a youngster and loves every chance to return. He says it’s for the fishing but, of course, I always said the same thing. The truth is, no one in my family cares if we feel the tug of a trout as we wander along the river in a cool breeze. It’s about the warm feeling you get when you return to that special place every year.  – Todd Bigelow

A backpacker lies flat on the ground in Illal Meadows.

Illal Meadows, BC

The hike in to Illal Meadows, in southwest British Columbia is well worth the reward for effort. There are numerous tarns and mountain views in all directions with plenty of great options for lakeside camping. I try my best to make it up to the meadows at least once a year, ideally in autumn.  I love wandering through the colorful alpine meadows, feeling the crisp cold air, watching the golden sunsets and eating the plethora of late season blueberries that can be found here! The three peaks of varying difficulty accessible from the meadows (Illal Peak, Jim Kelly Peak (pictured) and Coquihalla Mountain), combined with the stunning landscape and scenery, make this area a great weekend destination for hiking, climbing, and camping. – Chris Kimmel

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Humphrey’s Ledge, North Conway, NH

North Conway is an absolute zoo between mid September and mid October. Europeans, Asians, mid-westerners and anyone else within a days drive descend on out neck of the woods. They also loose all common sense and driving etiquette. I’ve seen a bus load of people standing in the middle of the highway taking selfies with the fall foliage on the side of the road.
So this time of year requires locals to run for the hills, cliffs or remote spots to stay safe. Even a five minute walk off of the road cuts the crowds dramatically. One of my favorite local retreats is Humphrey’s Ledge a short drive from town, it’s got some bouldering under a canopy of maples that turn bright orange this time of year. A bit further up the hill is the cliff proper and it’s a bit scruffy but it faces south and stays warm on those chilly fall days. After one pitch up our little valley stretches out, blanketed in a crazy mix of colors only New England can produce.  – Joe Klementovich

A Cape Cod cranberry grower and his crew "rack up" cranberries with booms after flooding a bog in Brewster, MA.

Cranberry bogs, Cape Cod, MA

Every fall, the cranberry bogs in my small town on Cape Cod are transformed from dull fields into exquisite bogs of floating red berries. To harvest the berries, cranberry growers like Ray Thacher, whose crew is working in this photo, flood the bogs with water and the berries float to the top. They can then be “racked” together and then vacuumed up into a waiting truck. Ray’s family has been growing cranberries for over 60 years on Cape Cod and I love the visual transformation their work brings about. Visitors as well as local residents often stop beside bogs this time of year and watch the cranberry growers at work. And while most of us associate cranberries with Thanksgiving, there are so many things other delicious things to make with cranberries besides a sauce for turkey like cranberry scones, cranberry pancakes, cranberry butter, cranberry granola, cranberry smoothies, cranberry-glazed ham and even cranberry margaritas! – Julia Cumes   

The sun glows on the top of the peaks of Little Cottonwood Canyon as it sets above the Utah mountains on a clear fall day.

Mount Superior, Little Cottonwood Canyon, UT

Mount Superior in Little Cottonwood Canyon, Utah, is a hike I had always wanted to do but never seemed to find the time. On my last day living in Utah a friend and I finally made it out to do the South Ridge of Mount Superior. This is more of a scramble then a hike. Lots of exposure and expansive views are encountered along the way as you gain over 2600 feet to the peak at 11,040 feet. The route we took on the way down (The Cardiff Pass Trail) was much more mellow. The elevation gain was still intense over a short distance, but much less exposure and risk of falling, but still an amazing viewpoint of the Wasatch Mountains, especially as the setting sun casts its yellow glow on the nearby peaks.
Fall is the perfect time to do this hike. The summer heat is gone, with the cool crisp nip of fall in the air. The Aspen trees in the canyon have started to change. Vibrant yellows shine all over the mountainsides and even little bit of snow has started to cover the north faces up high. A quick jaunt up from Salt Lake, hiking Mount Superior is a perfect afternoon activity if you find yourself in town for a weekend, or for an entire season. If you are searching for a solid work out and amazing views of Little Cottonwood Canyon, a hike up iconic Mount Superior is a great way to get both. – Ben Girardi

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Door County, WI

One of my favorite roads in our entire state of Wisconsin is at the very tip of Door County, a favorite vacation spot for many folks (quite possibly due to the numerous apple and cherry orchards). Often simply referred to as “the winding road in Door County,” this unique must-see landmark should be attributed to Jens Jensen, the famed Danish-born landscape architect that influenced this amazing spot. Jensen founded The Clearing, a Door County school for landscape architects. I always wanted to go in the fall and got lucky when a trio of corvette’s came through. The curvy road looks like it goes on forever but it actually stops where you can board a ferry to Washington Island. To get this shot I compressed the curves using a long lens and had to stand in the middle of the road. My wife had my back! – Jeffrey Phelps

Lake George New York in Fall from the Pinnacle

Lake George, NY

Much may have changed since Thomas Jefferson described it as “… the most beautiful water I ever saw”, but Lake George in New York’s Adirondack Mountains remains among the most beautiful lakes in the U.S., even more so when fall foliage blankets the shores with the jewell tones of autumn.  While there is no shortage of beautiful hiking around Lake George, one of my favorites for a quick outing is the roughly 1 mile trail to the Pinnacle on the Lake’s western shore. Short enough for an after work hike and family friendly, the trail offers a big payoff with a breathtaking panorama of the Lake. It is also the perfect spot to watch the sun rise with a thermos of coffee for a great start to the day. – Zaneta Hough, The Open Road Images

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Anywhere on my Bike

Autumn, with its vivid colors, sights and smells, is my favorite time of year to ride my bike.  Every time I pedal out of the driveway I instantly revert to my mischievous 8 year-old self – skidding through every leaf pile, speeding through the tunnels of luminosity with a racing heart and a broad grin on my face. – Bob Allen

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Crystal Mill, Elk Mountains, CO

One day its hot and your paddling down the river, the next your trudging your way up a mountain through snow. Somewhere between those days is Autumn and we’re gifted with perfect cool weather for hiking and the most amazing display of color among the aspen trees. Grab a friend and venture deep into the Elk Mountains of Colorado to the Crystal Mill. – Brandon Huttenlocher

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Boston Hill Farm, Andover, MA

The only thing that has changed at Boston Hill Farm in Andover, Massachusetts, is us. We have been going to pick up our pumpkins there every fall for the past eight years. The hay rides are just as bumpy, the cider donuts just as yummy, the foliage just as vibrant. But now my boys pull each other in the radio flyer wagons, carry their own pumpkins and…..sigh…..no longer let me pick out their clothes. I plan to take them back again this year- and despite some preteen eye-rolling- I know they will still have fun searching the fall fields for the perfect jack-o-lantern. Even if they aren’t wearing absolutely adorable overalls. – Laurie Swope

Eastern Sierra Fall Color

Eastern Sierra, CA

Here in the Eastern Sierra, October ushers in crisp temps and the explosion of Fall colors. Trout are hungry and although every drainage in the region is active with fisherman, the fishing pressure of summer is significantly reduced. Mountains are alive with preparations for winter as wildlife is on the move. Migratory birds are passing through overhead, mule deer return from their summer hangouts and the local black bear population is preparing for hibernation. Cooler temps are perfect for hiking and the backcountry is almost deserted. Day hikes and longer backpack trips are solitary adventures in this quiet season. Fall is the BEST season on the Eastside. – Rick Saez

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King Range National Conservation Area, CA

I was thrilled to be able to share this autumn, a special time of year for me, with friends on Lost Coast Trail in Northern California. Located in the rugged and remote King Range National Conservation Area, with no major roads nearby, the area is secluded and mostly untouched by man. Along the hike, the golden grasses of costal prairies sway in the ocean breeze and glow during the vibrant Pacific sunsets. Often you will see and hear sea lions basking in the afternoon sun. The intertidal zones of this trail are also unique. For several miles, the trail is only accessible during low tide. Autumn has less visitors on the 24 miles of desolate shoreline and provides a fantastic solitary getaway, setting this trail apart from the rest. – Michael Okimoto

Bill Swift, owner of Swift Canoe & Kayak, paddles canoe in early morning on Oxtongue Lake near Algonquin Park, Muskoka, Ontario, Canada. (Photo by Henry Georgi/Aurora)

Oxtongue Lake, ON

Autumn is a great time for two of my favorite activities – mountain biking and canoeing! Canoeing in autumn is truly magical for many reasons; no mosquitoes for one! Also because of the cooler temperatures you almost always have some degree of mist in the early mornings. It lends an ethereal, timeless sense to an early morning paddle on a calm, flat lake. When you’re in this “zone” paddling becomes effortless. In this photo my friend Bill is paddling on Oxtongue Lake, just outside Algonquin Park in Ontario, Canada, a prime canoeing destination. This image is one of my all-time favorites; in fact, a friend recently created an abstract painting from this photo that we now have hanging on our wall. – Henry Georgi

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Greenland

Autumn in Greenland is one of the most magical places in the world.  The Arctic tundra starts turning brilliant shades of yellow, orange, and red in late August into mid-September, and provides stark contrast to the rocky, rugged, and sometimes icy surrounding landscapes.   This particular location along the shoreline of Disko Island off the coast of Greenland across Disko Bay from Ilulissat is one of the most magical places I’ve come across in my travels.  It took some hiking from the tiny community of Qeqertarsuaq to find, but once we crossed over the crest of a hill about 3 or 4 miles out, this scene unfolded before our eyes and took our breaths away.   Autumn colours, waterfalls, crazy basalt columns…and icebergs.  It truly had it all.  We called it, and still call it (I’ve been back, twice):  Arctic Eden. – Dave Brosha

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Hamilton Falls, Jamaica, VT

This photo is actually a reflection turned upside down. It’s of Hamilton Falls, a 150 foot waterfall in Jamaica, VT. I try to make an annual trip up to Vermont every Columbus Day weekend because foliage is usually at it’s peak in the area. There are endless hidden streams, trails, and scenic barns down winding dirt roads in Vermont. If you look hard enough you can find new gems just off the road or deep down a trail. What makes this area even more special are the lack of crowds. Vermont draws “leaf peepers” from around the world, but you won’t get frustrated by tons of tourists. There’s always a sense of serenity. – Matt Andrew

A man fly fishing on the North Fork of the Payette River in Idaho on a Fall morning.

Payette River, ID

This spot on the North Fork of the Payette is chock-full of people all summer long.  Once autumn is here, they just disappear, and by midweek everywhere in town becomes my own private Idaho! I especially love this stretch of the river because of all the twists and turns, the massive trees and the hidden but easy access. – Melissa Shelby

View Of Sports Authority Field At Mile High Stadium In Denver, Colorado

Mile High Stadium, CO

For my family, Fall will always be about October baseball, my husband’s birthday and Denver Broncos football.  Attending a game on a crisp autumn Sunday, the stadium buzzes with energy and the fans joyously cheer with a contagious and inspired enthusiasm.  The friendly confines of Mile High have been a place of comfort for four decades for my family, so each Sunday standing in a warm shimmering sun with a cool Rocky breeze surrounding the wave of Orange feels like home. Fall and subsequently football brings family and friends together. – Leslie Parrott

Instagram Tips

Instagram continues to grow as a marketing tool and a way to tell your brand’s story. It’s much easier to keep an up to date Instagram account than it is to update your website with new work, whether you’re a photographer or a brand. We asked some of our photographers who either have large followings or are being recognized as Instagrammers to watch for some tips:

Rachid Dahnoun, @rachidphoto

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Be Engaged. Most people who don’t do well on social networks forget that it isn’t all about you; you need to interact with other people on the network by liking, commenting and following other accounts.  Building relationships with other users will really help boost your own account’s engagement.

Be Consistent. Posting once a week isn’t going to cut it.  Nor is posting a beautiful landscape one day and a furry kitten the next.  Consistency across the board is key.  You want to be posting at least 5 days a week (7 is ideal).  That said, you don’t want to over-post either.  If you overload your followers with 4 posts in an hour they are likely to dump you.  For content, you want to stay true to yourself and your brand.  When someone looks at your feed the work should look and feel cohesive, just like a portfolio.

Jess McGlothin, @jess_mcglothlin_media 

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Look Outside Your Immediate Target Audience. I specialize in fly-fishing and outdoor adventure travel, but I’ve seen an increase in fitness and general travel followers when I tailor a post to less-technical viewers. A fun one-liner with a post about my favorite sandals for airplane rides? That’s guaranteed to land a few new followers outside my normal “dude with a beard and a fly rod” genre.

Tell Stories. An image is worth a thousand words, as they say. When someone is flipping through their feed, I want the image to make them stop and look deeper. It’s a tenet of strong photography, and it’s important here too. Instagram is a great tool of escapism… enable that a bit; let people into the story. They’ll respond.

Let People in to Your World. Adding a ten-second video into your feed once in a while allows viewers to feel like they’re behind the scenes. In the past few months I shot iPhone videos of helicopters landing on rigs in the Gulf of Mexico, people passing through the Lima airport at 1AM and a team bumping along a backcountry road in the Amazon jungle while dodging bamboo overgrowth. Video is a fantastic tool to relate to your audience… show that it’s not all fun and glory and good times! Sometimes the job is sleeping on airport floors, dealing with infected wounds and burning time on long car rides. Let’s not be afraid to talk about that!

Andrew Peacock, @footloosefotography

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Be True to Yourself. It’s important that I am excited about posting and it helps if I keep things fresh and post very recent work rather than spend time ‘mining’ my archive looking for something to post just because I feel pressure to do so! I think of my Instagram feed as a portfolio for my adventure travel photography, so I only post high quality images and I keep it ‘real’ in terms of any post processing, to ensure my feed is an accurate reflection of the style of work I deliver to clients.

Find Partners. I’m very lucky to be able to travel widely, so I make sure to post images across a range of subjects and locations to appeal to those looking for adventure travel inspiration on Instagram. Occasionally  I’ll also share my work on a feed with a larger audience. By establishing personal connections with relevant people at companies with huge Instagram followings – Lonely Planet, for instance – I’ve gained an avenue to share my work with a broader audience.

Paul Zizka, @paulzizkaphoto

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#Trending! Posting images relevant to current natural events seems to give my post an extra boost in interaction. Whether it’s season specific, ie. snowy scene during the Winter months, or an Aurora post during or after a solar storm, finding images that people can relate to as something they’re experiencing or thinking about is a strategy that pays off for me.

Sean Davey, @sean_davey

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Ask Questions. I post a a mix of images as they happen, along with classic surf images from my days as a magazine photographer, to keep the content interesting and different as much as I can. I try to engage my audience as much as possible. Ask them a question about the picture, or in my case, I ask them to name the photo and reward the winner with a few 8×10’s.  I see that as part of my advertising budget, so to speak.

David Hanson, @davidhanson3

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Share Personal Work. For over a dozen years I’ve collected portraits and interviews of people I meet, most complete strangers. With over 400, I turned to Instagram to post one per day for 2017. It’s a fun way to stay both consistent and unpredictable. I was a writer before I was a photographer so I like digging beyond the pic. And part of me hopes to learn some secret to life from the people.

Kay Vilchis Zapata, @kayuvilchis

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Join the Celebration. I like to upload photos on days that are celebrating something, like for example National Dolphin Day. I think that by celebrating something everyone talks about that topic and in the same way you can make your audience aware of conserving those important elements and taking more care of the planet.

The Symphony of Ice

Peter Doucette, Lucifer in Chains M9 Cathederal Ledge, North Conway, NH
Lucifer in Chains M9 Cathedral Ledge, North Conway, NH

Five a.m. is early for a weekend alarm, but winter’s back. There’s too little daylight to waste it. The ice is in, the days are short, and the mountains are calling. Roll out of bed, pull on long underwear and fleece. Fill a water bottle, grab the already packed backpack by the door and go.
The warm car is the final bastion of heat. Don’t waste it. Don’t open the door a moment too soon, even if it means tying your boots hunched over the steering wheel. Soak in the final few warm minutes. They are precious. Once in the landscape it’s the sounds you notice: the crunch of the snow underfoot, the wind as it whistles through the trees, the rustle of nylon rubbing nylon. The hike is the warm up stretch before the fight begins. It’s a moment to look at the mountains, the snow, the trees and wilderness before the landscape rears to blanket your view.
The final walk below the ice is always a nervous one. The columns have a way of dwarfing and dampening, reminding you of how small you are. But in that frozen space the sounds continue—the zip of extra layers, the clink of carabiners and ice screws, the hiss of rope running through gloves—and are amplified by the cold.
Then it’s time. Tink! Tink! Sink a tool. Tink! Tink! Sink the other. Thunk! A boot. Thunk! The other boot. Ice climbing, the frozen symphony, has begun. The whir of ice screws cutting into the depth, the tap of the belayer dancing to stay warm, the drumbeat of falling ice. The movement becomes its own language, emerges in the winter quiet, echos through the canyons and reverberates through the ice. It is a landscape without heat but full of songs. Climb higher, into the breeze and creek of swaying trees. The scrape of steel mingles with the sounds of the forest. The hush of the falling snow only leaves the chorus ringing louder. The noise of belayers, other climbers, the human race and the world as a whole fades. Only you are left. You and the mountain. And you hear each other.

For great ice climbing photography visit AuroraPhotos.com

She’s All That: 17 Photos that Celebrate Adventurous Women Around the World

Today is Women’s Equality Day! Designated as a national holiday in 1971, Women’s Equality Day marks the anniversary of the passing of the 19th amendment which officially gave women the right to vote in 1920.

To honor this great day in history, we’re celebrating the adventurous women all across the globe that inspire us with 17 photos from our ‘She’s All That’ gallery, which capture the power, spirit and greatness that is woman in the outdoors!

Today, and every day, women everywhere should be treated as equals. Learn more about how you can support women’s equality here.

Strong, athletic female does an aerial on the trail at Wonderland Lake in Boulder, Colorado
Strong, athletic female does an aerial on the trail at Wonderland Lake in Boulder, Colorado. Photo by Alexandra Simone
A girl surfs a small wave on her longboard
A girl surfs a small wave on her longboard. Photo by Sergio Villalba
Sarah Felchlin smiles for a portrait while carrying her crash pad to go bouldering at the Buttermilk boulders just outside of Bishop California.
Sarah Felchlin smiles for a portrait while carrying her crash pad to go bouldering at the Buttermilk boulders just outside of Bishop California. Photo by Corey Rich
Artist's Point, Cascades, WA
Artist’s Point, Cascades, WA. Photo by Gabe Rogel
Woman holds out two fern fronds like wings in the Hoh Rainforest, WA.
Woman holds out two fern fronds like wings in the Hoh Rainforest, WA. Photo by Hannah Dewey
A woman hooked up to a bluefish. Cape Cod, MA.
A woman hooked up to a bluefish. Cape Cod, MA. Photo by Jess McGlothlin Media
Portrait of an Appalachian Trail hiker taken at Trail Days in Damascus, VA. Trail Days is a festival that Attracts thousands of hikers past and present.
Portrait of an Appalachian Trail hiker taken at Trail Days in Damascus, VA. Trail Days is a festival that Attracts thousands of hikers past and present. Photo by Michael D. Wilson
Girl doing yoga and laughing on the top of a volcano in Fuerteventura, Canary Islands
Girl doing yoga and laughing on the top of a volcano in Fuerteventura, Canary Islands. Photo by Mauro Ladu
Amy Rasic and Janine Patitucci climbing the Aiguille d'Entreves on a sunny day in the French Alps
Amy Rasic and Janine Patitucci climbing the Aiguille d’Entreves on a sunny day in the French Alps. Photo by PatitucciPhoto
A young woman holds her paddle above her head while canoeing across Lanezi Lake during a multi-day canoe trip through Bowron Lake Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada.
A young woman holds her paddle above her head while canoeing across Lanezi Lake during a multi-day canoe trip through Bowron Lake Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada. Photo by Christopher Kimmel
Mountain biking on a wet day along the Oregon Coast. Nehalem, OR
Mountain biking on a wet day along the Oregon Coast. Nehalem, OR. Photo by Justin Bailie
A woman hanging upside down as she is lowered from a rock climb.
A woman hanging upside down as she is lowered from a rock climb. Photo by Mike Schirf
Female slackliner walks a highline at Longue-Rive with the St. Lawrence River in the background
Female slackliner walks a highline at Longue-Rive with the St. Lawrence River in the background. Photo by Jared Alden
A female climber boulders a series of huecos on an overhanging roof at sunrise. A band of striated sandstone is in the distance.
A female climber boulders a series of huecos on an overhanging roof at sunrise. A band of striated sandstone is in the distance. Photo by Kiliii Fish
Happy woman paddling a kayak in a wave
Happy woman paddling a kayak in a wave. Photo by Leslie Parrott
floorball players
Floorball players stand against a setting sun. Photo by Adam Kokot
Garni Canyon, Armenia
Garni Canyon, Armenia. Photo by Gabe Rogel

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