Au Vol. 8: National Parks

In the 100 years the National Park Service has been in existence, they’ve created 58 parks as well as 82 national monuments, providing a place for both recreation and conservation. In this homage to one of our greatest national resources, we explore the magnificent National Park system, which enables some truly spectacular and unique interactions between visitors and nature. Each park has it’s own story, and our photographers embrace them all, from icy glaciers in Alaska to fiery volcanoes in Hawaii.

Woman hiking in Rocky Mountain National Park at Emerald Lake during winter.

Tom Frost to be Inducted Into 2016 Hall of Mountaineering Excellence

Aurora contributor Tom Frost will be inducted into The American Alpine Club’s 2016 Hall of Mountaineering Excellence during the Club’s Inaugural Awards Dinner on May 7th, 2016. This prestigious accolade is given to those who have made lasting contributions both on and off the mountain. Climbers awarded have inspired a legacy for future climbers, positively impacted the environment, and advanced the fields of science and medicine, all while accomplishing incredible climbing feats.

Frost is being recognized for his efforts in saving Yosemite’s iconic Camp 4 and his many first ascents in Yosemite including the Salathé Wall. The other inductees this year include Geoff Tabin, John Roskelley, Hugh Herr and Libby Sauter.

About Tom Frost

Tom Frost is an accomplished climber and photographer. He began making first ascents in Yosemite in the late 1950’s climbing with American rock-climbing pioneers like Royal Robbins, Chuck Pratt and Joe Fitschen. In 1961, Frost and Yvon Chouinard, one of the leading climbers of the ‘Golden Age of Yosemite Climbing’, visited Grand Teton National Park and made the first ascent of the northeast face of Disappointment Peak. That same year Frost, along with Robbins and Pratt, began the first ascent of the Salathé Wall on El Capitan. It took them a total of 11 days and 36 pitches of vertical climbing to finish the route. In October of 1964, with Robbins, Pratt and Chouinard, Frost made the first ascent of the North America Wall on El Capitan.

Yosemite climbing pioneers Chuck Pratt and Royal Robbins arriving at the Cyclops Eye bivy on the first ascent of the North America Wall on El Capitan. End of pitch 19, Fall 1964.
Yosemite climbing pioneers Chuck Pratt and Royal Robbins arriving at the Cyclops Eye bivy on the first ascent of the North America Wall on El Capitan. End of pitch 19, Fall 1964.

Frost is a longtime advocate of environmental ethics in climbing, using natural protection whenever possible, guided by respect for tradition and a desire to “leave no trace.” He opposes what he believes to be excessive use of bolts by sport climbers, especially the altering of traditional climbing routes previously completed without such aids.

Frost played a critical role in the fight to save Camp 4 in Yosemite Valley, starting in 1997. He filed a lawsuit against the National Park Service to save the historic rock climbers’ campsite with the support of the American Alpine Club. The effort was ultimately successful and Camp 4 was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Yosemite climbing pioneer Yvonne Chouinard checking out the view from Big Sur ledge the first ascent of the North America Wall on El Capitan. End of pitch 11, Fall 1964.
Yosemite climbing pioneer Yvonne Chouinard checking out the view from Big Sur ledge the first ascent of the North America Wall on El Capitan. End of pitch 11, Fall 1964.

Frost photographed many of his first ascents. Glen Denny, a mountaineering photographer and author of the book Yosemite in the Sixties, wrote of Frost’s photographic achievements saying, “Most of the climbing photos you see now are prearranged setups for the camera on much-traveled routes. The impressive thing about Frost is that his classic images were seen, and photographed, during major first ascents. In those awesome situations he led, cleaned, hauled, day after day and–somehow–used his camera with the acuity of a Cartier-Bresson strolling about a piazza. Extremes of heat and cold, storm and high altitude, fear and exhaustion . . . it didn’t matter. He didn’t seem to feel the pressure.”

In 1979, Frost co-founded Chimera Photographic Lighting with Gary Regester. The company, based in Boulder, CO, manufactures lighting products for photography and filming.

Yosemite climbing pioneers Royal Robbins and Glen Denny on the Easy Street ledge on the second exploration ascent of the North America Wall on El Capitan. Pitch 6, Spring 1964. Taken by Tom Frost
Yosemite climbing pioneers Royal Robbins and Glen Denny on the Easy Street ledge on the second exploration ascent of the North America Wall on El Capitan. Pitch 6, Spring 1964. Taken by Tom Frost

Royal Robbins offered the following description of Frost: “Tom is the kindest and gentlest and most generous person I have ever met, with never an ill word to say of anyone. He is also a man of courage and leadership, as witness his recent vanguard role in the effort to save Camp 4 in Yosemite. And he continues to possess the true spirit of climbing. Just a couple of years ago, at age 60, with his son, he climbed three big El Capitan routes, one of them the North American Wall.”

The American Alpine club will be hosting the Excellence in Climbing Awards Dinner, presented by Adidas Outdoor, on May 7, 2016 at the History Colorado Center. To go along with the keynote and induction ceremony, attendees will enjoy a cocktail reception, live and silent auctions, libations and fine dining. All proceeds benefit The American Alpine Club Library and The Bradford Washburn American Mountaineering Museum.

Tickets are limited for this event. For more information and to reserve your spot, head over to The American Alpine Club’s website.

See more of Tom Frost’s work here. 

#AuWinterContest

When winter hits, our photographers disappear. For three months, all of our emails get an auto-response: “Out of office, skiing / snowboarding / ice-climbing / chasing yetis / making badass snowmen, will get back to you after my hot cocoa.” So it seemed only fitting that the latest Instagram contest for our photographer community centered around the cold. Winter is the time of year most people hunker down indoors, but our photographers (and their dogs) embraced the frigid temperatures, battled some extreme conditions, and came back with fantastic images.

Kudos to the winning photographers:

Staff Pick: Dave Brosha 

@davebrosha
Peace. Yellowknife, Northwest Territories by @davebrosha

Most Popular: Sean Naugle

@rockninjasean
Zion the pit mastiff learning to survive in the snow. By @rockninjasean

Larry’s Arbitrary Pick: Matthew DeLorme 

@mdelormephoto
Bringing in a herd of bison is no easy task, especially when it’s negative 15 degrees out. Zapata Ranch, Colorado. By @mdelormephoto

Below are just a few more of our favorites.

You can check out all of the contest images and keep up with our photographers on their amazing adventures by following us on Instagram.

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